Monday, November 16, 2009

Challenges or Signs?

My friend sounded quite unhappy when I spoke to her yesterday. Her worry was her job. She likes the domain of work, but is not happy with the challenges (or lack of it) that she is faced with. I tell her to look for a change. Due to some limitations, she is unable to find another one.
"Take a break," I suggest, "and spend time with your daughter, and probably look for a job later."
She says, "Would it not be a sin to leave the job that God has given me?"
"Maybe God wants you to take a break. Which is why He is making you feel so unhappy. Maybe this is His sign."
She is doubtful. "What if it is the Devil trying to provoke me?"

I am certain of it. The hurdles that Destiny throws at us every now and then are not always challenges that we are expected to cross over. Often, they are warnings from our Guardian Angel, to keep us safe.

Like, someone's lost ticket to the Titanic.
We probably are not expected to move mountains and get ourselves another ticket.

Like, power going down when we are about to hit 'Send' on an already delayed, very important business mail.
When power comes back, we see another mail that came in ten minutes after power went out, which would have made our mail redundant, or worthless, even foolish, had we sent it.

Like, forgetting the key of the house and finding ourselves unable to get in after a tiring day's work.
We spend one or two hours at the neighbour's place where we never had time to visit, and feel refreshed by the time the spouse comes home with the spare key to let us in.

Like, giving in to a screaming child who refuses to go to school all of a sudden.
We find that the school was closed that day and we had not seen the holiday list.

Like, finding yourself unable to handle the pressure of work and home.
Perhaps it is time we looked for a change. In career or life.

1 comment:

  1. I don't look for destiny and meaning in everything, but I do look for happiness in the things that matter. If you hate your job, the money it provides your family it is not as important as the happiness it deprives them of. Autobiographies of people who say "We were poor but happy" are usually more rewarding than the ones in which the person says "My parents were rarely around and never in a good mood, but we sure lived well!"